Black Cockatoos of Western Australia

About the Black Cockatoos of Western Australia

There are three endemic species in Western Australia: the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos, the Baudin’s Black Cockatoos and the Forest Red-Tailed Black Cockatoos.

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos and Baudin’s Black Cockatoos are also commonly known as White Tailed Black Cockatoos. Baudin’s Black Cockatoos have a longer bill compared to the Carnaby’s and their calling sound like “witcha” while the Carnaby’s call sound like “wee-loo”.

The Forest Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo is the shortest of all three species. The male has bright orange-red band in the tail and a dark bill. Females have yellow spots on their head and wings, their belly is barred with orange-yellow and their tail is banded with orange-yellow. The bill is pale greyish white.

All three of these iconic Western Australian birds are currently listed as threatened under both state and federal legislation. The most significant threat continues to be loss of habitat. Those species also suffer due to poaching, illegal shooting, competition for nesting hollows and vehicle strikes.

About Kaarakin The Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre

Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre in the Perth Hills is a non-profit, non-government organisation run largely by dedicated volunteers.

They are the premier black cockatoo rehabilitation facility in Australia, admitting, rehabilitating and releasing endangered or threatened endemic black cockatoos. They also run a revegetation programme to provide future habitat for the black cockatoos, and an outreach programme to educate the community. You can find out more about the Black Cockatoos on their website.

My Volunteer Work at Kaarakin

My volunteer job at Kaarakin involves taking care of the bird, participating in fundraising events as well as running the Instagram page. I have a growing collection of photos with some prints available for purchase on my gallery.

How You can Help

  • Volunteer at Kaarakin
  • Contact the centre if you find an injured or sick black cockatoo in need of care (08 9390 2288)
  • Plant local and native plants
  • Report poaching or shooting to the Department of Parks and Wildlife (1800 449 453)
  • Spread the word

 

I hope that my images go a little way in the protection and conservation of those beautiful birds.